To be a Christian

To be a Christian
by
Paul J.

With all the talk from the Republican candidates about how superior their own personal religious strengths are, it should remind all of us what it really means to be a Christian.

Do you consider yourself a Christian? What are your most important Christian principles?

Considering how Jesus taught and how he lived his life, here are some Christian principles many consider important. How do you rate on these Christian principles?

  1. Works of Mercy: Do you support and vote for a political party that is for providing material needs of the weak, sick, and poor? Or do you vote for a party that is against health care for all?
  2. Does your political party seek to take away rights from others, such as gays, or illegal aliens, or Muslims? Or does your political party show mercy for all, regardless of their differences?
  3. Salt and Light: Do you shine like a lamp and show your political party that you believe in “do unto others as you would have done unto you?” Or, do you support a political party that wants tax breaks for the rich while deserting the needs of the poor?
  4. Does your political party want to cut expenses by taking away benefits and services for the poor to help the wealthy? Or does your political party want the wealthy to share in order to feed the hungry, and heal the sick?
  5. Are you sure that your political party shines with the light that you want illuminating you and your family and you community and your country?

If you are a Christian, these are some difficult questions and hopefully will make you stop and think, regardless of your political party.

Truly I say to you, Inasmuch as you have done it to one of the least of these my brothers, you have done it to me. [Matthew 25.40]

 

3 thoughts on “To be a Christian”

  1. Love it! Great post. This is so awfully true. Only thing is that truth and the willfully blind Republican ideals are never seen in the same mind set.

  2. I loved this post and the other like it. Keep these up. It’s refreshing to see the stark differences between what the typical Republican voter says is important and what their political party says is important. Keep showing the great chasm between those conflicting perspectives and the Republicans voters will start to realize their party does not reflect their real perspectives.

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